Skip to content

Typed Persuasive Essay Rubric Fifth

Grading rubrics can be of great benefit to both you and your students. For you, a rubric saves time and decreases subjectivity. Specific criteria are explicitly stated, facilitating the grading process and increasing your objectivity. For students, the use of grading rubrics helps them meet or exceed expectations, to view the grading process as being “fair,” and helps them set goals for future learning.

In order to help your students meet or exceed expectations of the assignment, be sure to discuss the rubric with your students when you assign a persuasion project. It is helpful to show them examples of pieces that meet and do not meet the expectations. As an added benefit, because the criteria are explicitly stated in the rubric, the use of it decreases the likelihood that students will be confused about the grade they receive. The explicitness of the expectations helps students know exactly why they lost points on the assignment and aids them in setting goals for future improvement.  Use the Visuals/Delivery category to grade audio and visual elements in speeches, PowerPoint presentations, blogs, posters, skits, podcasts, or any other assignment where visuals and delivery play roles. If your assignment does not require speech or visuals, simply disregard this part of the rubric.

  • Routinely have students score peers’ work using the rubric as the assessment tool. This increases their level of awareness of the traits that distinguish successful persuasive projects from those that fail to meet the criteria.
  • Alter some expectations or add additional traits on the rubric as needed. For example, if the assignment is to create a persuasive podcast, criteria such as articulation, communication, sound effects, and audio clarity may be added. You may also adapt the criteria to make it more rigorous for advanced learners and less stringent for lower level learners. In addition, you may want to include content-specific criteria for your subject area.
  • After you and your students have used the rubric, have them work in groups to make suggested alterations to the rubric to more precisely match their needs or the parameters of a specific persuasive assignment. For example, if you wanted them to work in cooperative groups to write and present persuasive skits, possible criteria could include teamwork and the length of the skit.

Grades   6 – 12  |  Lesson Plan

Persuade Me in Five Slides! Creating Persuasive Digital Stories

After students write persuasive essays, use this lesson to challenge them to summarize their essays concisely by creating five-slide presentations.

 

Grades   3 – 5  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Can You Convince Me? Developing Persuasive Writing

Through a classroom game and resource handouts, students learn about the techniques used in persuasive oral arguments and apply them to independent persuasive writing activities.

 

 RubiStar en Español     
Home | Find Rubric | Create Rubric | Login | Sign Up | Tutorial    
    Create Rubrics for your Project-Based Learning Activities

Find out how to make this rubric interactive

    Persuasive Essay : College Essay


10 - Above Standards
8 - Meets Standards
6 - Approaching Standards
4 & Below - Below Standards
The introductory paragraph has a strong hook or attention grabber that is appropriate for the audience. This could be a strong statement, a relevant quotation, statistic, or question addressed to the reader.
The introductory paragraph has a hook or attention grabber, but it is weak, rambling or inappropriate for the audience.
The author has an interesting introductory paragraph but the connection to the topic is not clear.
The introductory paragraph is not interesting AND is not relevant to the topic.
Focus or Thesis Statement
The thesis statement names the topic of the essay and outlines the main points to be discussed.
The thesis statement names the topic of the essay.
The thesis statement outlines some or all of the main points to be discussed but does not name the topic.
The thesis statement does not name the topic AND does not preview what will be discussed.
All of the evidence and examples are specific, relevant and explanations are given that show how each piece of evidence supports the author's position.
Most of the evidence and examples are specific, relevant and explanations are given that show how each piece of evidence supports the author's position.
At least one of the pieces of evidence and examples is relevant and has an explanation that shows how that piece of evidence supports the author's position.
Evidence and examples are NOT relevant AND/OR are not explained.
A variety of thoughtful transitions are used. They clearly show how ideas are connected
Transitions show how ideas are connected, but there is little variety
Some transitions work well, but some connections between ideas are fuzzy.
The transitions between ideas are unclear OR nonexistent.
The conclusion is strong and leaves the reader solidly understanding the writer's position. Effective restatement of the position statement begins the closing paragraph.
The conclusion is recognizable. The author's position is restated within the first two sentences of the closing paragraph.
The author's position is restated within the closing paragraph, but not near the beginning.
There is no conclusion - the paper just ends.
Demonstrates a clear understanding of the potential reader and uses appropriate vocabulary and arguments. Anticipates reader's questions and provides thorough answers appropriate for that audience.
Demonstrates a general understanding of the potential reader and uses vocabulary and arguments appropriate for that audience.
Demonstrates some understanding of the potential reader and uses arguments appropriate for that audience.
It is not clear who the author is writing for.
Author makes no errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content.
Author makes 1-2 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content.
Author makes 3-4 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content.
Author makes more than 4 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content.
Paper is typed, double-spaced, and five paragraphs long. The outline is also included.
Paper is typed, but not double-spaced. The essay is four to five paragraphs long. The outline is included.
Paper is not typed, but is double-spaced. The essay is four to five paragraphs long. The outline may or may not be included.
Paper is not typed and not double-spaced. The essay is less than five paragraphs and the outline may or may not be included.

Date Created: October 12, 2005